Prison Ministry Mission Story

Written by Catherine Heinhold Part of my prison ministry work is making phone calls for the inmates to their loved ones. Most prisons in Brazil do not have payphones, and possessing a cell phone can have serious negative consequences. Some inmates write and receive letters, but many don’t have access to pen, paper, envelopes or stamps – or simply are...
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Women Prison Education Ministry

Written by Kathy Bond I love this image of St. Ann and Mary that powerfully promotes women’s education. I also feel a connection to Saint Ann, as one of the female prisons that I have worked in over the last four years is named after her. In my ministries with women’s health education, I have seen many doors open over...
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A Community Takes Action

By Judy Walter: About 7 km outside Mombasa City, the informal settlement called Bangladesh is home to about 55,000 residents. This is a community that has been neglected by the government, having no public services provided to them. No water, no sewage or garbage disposal, no roads and no health services, to mention just a few. In 2007, the Irish...
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A Key – Opening New Doors for Imprisoned Women

Lay Missioner Katie Coldwell’s dream to implant an organic garden in the largest women’s penitentiary in Latin America By Kathleen Bond, Maryknoll Lay Missioner In rural southeast Brazil, Margarida Ferreira’s downward spiral began slowly.  After separating from her husband, she began drinking while working at her small bar.  Before long, she was smoking crack. A short stint in a rehab...
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My encounter with Antonia

My encounter with Antonia (Minh Nguyen) “Would you buy my knitted jacket, please?” The woman prisoner in her late 60 looked at me begging while she continued knitting. Our eyes met. My curiosity urged me to find out more about why someone wanted to sell something she was still working on. I was the last visitor leaving the prison before...
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Working for the Marginalized in Brazil

Written by Kim & Greg Fischer               Their names are Fida, Junette, Charlotte, Sherree, Fatan, Renata, Natalie, Ursile, Bibicha, Sila, Makapula, Binda, Ana, Dina. They come from Spain, the Netherlands, the Congo, Angola, South Africa, the Philippines, the United States. They speak French, English, Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and local dialects from Africa. Some are here as refugees, fleeing danger, separated...
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